Posts tagged behavior

Philosophers’ Carnival #91

A Colourful Ferris Wheel at Luna Park, Sydney

I received many entries for the 91st Philosophers’ Carnival (http://philosophycarnival.blogspot.com/). They all provided some thoughtful insights, so it was very difficult for me to narrow those all down to the submissions below. Thank you to everyone who sent in thier ideas. Without further ado, Philosophers’ Carnival #91!

Chris Hallquist presents The Inanity of Ontology : The Uncredible Hallq posted at The Uncredible Hallq — Thoughts on metaontology and whether or not two pieces of gum are really three things.

larryniven presents In which I disagree with Hume, among others posted at Rust Belt Philosophy — An evaluation of George Dickie’s paper “Iron, Leather, and Critical Principles” that particularly examines “the plausibility of real aesthetic principles.”

Kris Rhodes presents Orig/Deriv pt 2nd: When I read, must the words I’m reading have meaning for me only derivedly? posted at The Extended Cognition Blog — Original vs. derived meaning. Do words automatically trigger their meaning when we read them or do we assign meaning to words as we read?

Paul Gowder presents “I’m not a deliberative democrat, but I play one on TV.” posted at Uncommon Priors — A discussion of whether or not it “matters” if politicians lie, including ideas about whether the pattern of belief affects the normative outcome.

Richard presents Blameworthy Utilitarians posted at Philosophy, et cetera — A “sketch” of what it is to be a virtuous utilitarian.

Avery Archer presents Dilworth’s Propositional Indexing posted at The Space of Reasons — A study of John Dilworth’s theory of classification behavior as it relates to propositional thinking (and the possibility of assigning such behavior to animals that cannot communicate through speech).

Kenny Pearce presents Kant, Libertarianism, and the Limits of Contract Right posted at blog.kennypearce.net — Thoughts on the absolute freedom of contracts in libertarianism, Locke’s philosophy, and how Kantian morals can assist claims about this contractual freedom.

David Gawthorne presents Tye on Chalmers’ Argument for Possible Zombies posted at Intentional Objects — An entry on Tye’s treatment of Chalmers’ zombie argument. Touching on the issues of what it means for something to be positively conceivable and if existence can be a property.

Make sure to check out the next edition of the Philosophers’ Carnival at Philosophengang – The Philosopher’s Walk on June 15th!

Photos from stock.xchng.

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